Older Drivers

Age Related

Older Drivers

See Also: Young Drivers,

THE OVERVIEW

Although age itself does not determine driving capabilities, older drivers can experience declines in their sensory, cognitive, or physical functioning, which could negatively impact their driving and may increase their risk of involvement in traffic collisions. In South Carolina, from 2008 to 2012, older drivers (defined as 65 or more years of age) were involved in 13.9% of all traffic fatalities.

OUR CHALLENGE

Drivers aged 65 and older were involved in 10.5% of fatal collisions and 8.3% of severe injury collisions. While the involvement of older drivers in these collisions is less than their representation in the general driving population, older drivers are more likely to suffer severe injury or death when involved in a traffic collision.

Drivers aged 65 or older are more likely than their younger counterparts to be involved in fatal or severe injury collisions that occur at intersections, 40.2% versus 26.4%. Older drivers are more likely than their younger counterparts to be involved in a fatal or severe injury collision at an intersection than any other junction type.

Age Related Older Drivers
(Age Group and License)
View Graph